Lecture Series

Our regular location for Tuesday’s 7:30 p.m. programs will be the Masonic Temple, 19 Academy Street (disabled access is at rear) 

January 2017 program: note special time and place.

Chapel of St. Anne, ca. 1920. This view of the east end of the main chapel was made prior to the addition of the Chapel of the Holy Spirit to the south. Father Founder Frederick Cecil Powell looks on. Our October program.

Chapel of St. Anne, ca. 1920. This view of the east end of the main chapel was made prior to the addition of the Chapel of the Holy Spirit to the south. Father Founder Frederick Cecil Powell looks on. Our October program.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016
CHAPEL OF ST. ANNE:  A LIVING MASTERPIECE IN OUR MIDST
Doreen Stevens
This Arlington Heights landmark by celebrated architect Ralph Adams Cram recently observed its centennial.  Like the Episcopal religious women’s Order of Saint Anne for whom it was built, it has endured yet also evolved to meet contemporary needs.

Top: The circa 1868 Alvin Robbins mansion in 1909. Bottom: In 1912 the home was cut in half to make way for the new town hall and gardens, and moved to the corner of Russell and Prescott streets, where it was expanded. Today, it’s a distinctive condominium building in the Russell Historic District. Our November program.

Top: The circa 1868 Alvin Robbins mansion in 1909. Bottom: In 1912 the home was cut in half to make way for the new town hall and gardens, and moved to the corner of Russell and Prescott streets, where it was expanded. Today, it’s a distinctive condominium building in the Russell Historic District.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016
HOUSE-MOVING:  NEW MOTIVATIONS FOR SAVING OLD HOMES
Bob Fredieu and Jonathan Nyberg
Moving structures in Arlington was a not-infrequent practice to give new life to buildings in the era before power tools lowered construction costs. Today, relocating houses is a creative way to save historical treasures threatened by high value of the land on which they sit.   Enjoy seeing houses on the move!

Sunday, January 22, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.
OBJECTS OF EVERGREEN APPEAL
Sara Lundberg and Kenton Rhodes
Program held in Smith Museum at Jason Russell House
Enjoy an afternoon “at home” in the Smith Museum with a pop-up exhibition of objects and images from our collection not regularly on display—it’s a greening of the collective memory of Arlington!

Tuesday, February 28, 2017
MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY
Rosemarie Smurzynski
Take a virtual walk with a most engaging docent through one of America’s oldest and prestigious garden cemeteries, which remains in active use while growing in ways that are sympathetic to its historically significant landscape.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
MASONIC LODGES PAST & PRESENT
Alan Jones
Mystic Valley Lodge was created in 2004 through the merger of three historic lodges, located in the 1923 Masonic Temple on Academy Street, which in recent years has transformed into a community resource.  Enjoy many images of predecessor locations, such as Munroe Tavern and Pattee’s Bakery, and observe  Masonic rituals allowed for public viewing.

Aerial view of Arlington Center, looking northeast, 1897. St. Agnes Church (prior to its expansion) is recognizable at upper left. Russell Park is the large open green space in this scenic vista. Our April program.

Aerial view of Arlington Center, looking northeast, 1897. St. Agnes Church (prior to its expansion) is recognizable at upper left. Russell Park is the large open green space in this scenic vista.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
RUSSELL COMMON:  FROM GREEN TO GREEN AND IN BETWEEN
Richard A. Duffy and Special Guests
Arlington’s first public park was paved 90 years after its establishment to create acres of public automobile parking.  But it has greened anew since 199X on Wednesday afternoons with the Arlington Farmer’s Market.  Hear about its past and present, with the special stories of its farm vendors.

 

The Jason Russell House, hemmed-in by newer buildings on its historic battlefield and looking rather the worse for wear, as it appeared in the early 1920s prior to its purchase by the Arlington Historical Society.

The Jason Russell House, hemmed-in by newer buildings on its historic battlefield and looking rather the worse for wear, as it appeared in the early 1920s prior to its purchase by the Arlington Historical Society.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017
STATES OF THE ART IN BUILDING AND PRESERVATION PRACTICES AT THE JASON RUSSELL HOUSE
Doris Birmingham
Having recently celebrated the 300th anniversary of Jason Russell’s birth, take a fresh look at his 1740 farmhouse:  the alterations made by his descendants; its plight during the 30-year period after the last Russell moved out, and the Society’s conscientious efforts to preserve it after rescuing it from the threat of a wrecker’s ball in 1923.  The science of architectural conservation and restoration was in its infancy, but evidence of the best practices of the era prevailed. Smaller restoration projects in the later 20th century continue to reflect the state of the art.

Arlington Historical Society | 7 Jason Street, Arlington, MA 02476 | Contact us